Long forgotten recipe from 70′ a la Ottolenghi (and some spring stuff)

Weather has not been the best lately.Rain, hails and everything in between.Right now wind is so string that tree tops are bending double. Great weather for Kiddo to be in Easter vacation.

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I did some Easter Decorations outside. Burlap rabbit and flower baskets,door reef and small tree where I hang some eggs. That’s it. Inside not much because the terrorist cat Zorro is ripping everything down. I had nice Easter bush with eggs and all. Yeah,for one day! Zorro jumped on it and pulled whole vase down! I was not very amused..

I found really nice recipe last week.Light and easily modifiable. It is from Yotam Ottolenghi. I skipped mascarpone cheese simply because I didn’t have it and instead of making one big cake I made small portions.

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This will be our Easter dessert.I will add in the vanilla custard egg liquor.. Here is the recipe and link to Ottolenghis page:

Lemon and mascarpone mille-feuille
French terminology tends to make puddings seem daunting, but this one is pretty simple to make, and very impressive. Serves six to eight.

320g puff pastry, cut and rolled (or pre-rolled) into two 3-4mm-thick 18cm x 25cm rectangles
110g mascarpone
450ml double cream
20g icing sugar, sifted, plus 1 tsp extra for dusting
½ tbsp rose water
1 tsp vanilla extract
Seeds of 1 medium pomegranate (120g)
100g fresh raspberries
220g lemon curd (homemade or shop-bought)
1 tbsp dried small rose petals

Heat the oven to 180C/350F/gas mark 4. Put both pastry sheets on a baking tray lined with parchment. Cover with a second sheet of parchment, and top with another tray large enough to cover the pastry. Press down firmly, then weigh down the tray with something ovenproof (a cast-iron frying pan, say) and bake for 25 minutes. Remove the weight, top tray and top sheet of parchment, and return the pastry to the oven for six to eight minutes, until cooked and nicely golden-brown (check underneath). Leave to cool.

Put the mascarpone, cream, icing sugar, rose water and vanilla in a food mixer and whisk on a medium-high speed for a minute, until semi-thick and smooth (don’t overwhip, or it will go stiff or split; if does firm up too much, let it down with a bit of milk). Spoon half the cream mix into a bowl, and gently stir in two-thirds of the pomegranate seeds and all the raspberries. Spread this over one of the pastry rectangles right up to the edges, and transfer to a large, flat plate. Lay the second pastry sheet on top, and spread lemon curd evenly over that, again, taking it all the way to the edges. Spread with the remaining cream and use a palette knife to make a gentle wavy pattern in the top; the curd should start to run down the sides, which is fine.

To serve, sprinkle the rose petals and remaining pomegranate seeds over the cake and sprinkle with icing sugar. Use a sharp serrated knife to cut into rectangles and serve.

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2015/mar/20/1970s-recipes-millefeuille-trifle-yotam-ottolenghi

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